early reading3

What Are the Core Words to Teach Early Reading Skills?

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    Core words are essential for reading success since they are often encountered but challenging to decode using phonics rules.

    A kid who has mastered the 220 words on the Dolch list can read roughly 75% of the words in any work of children's literature.

    For this reason, it is crucial that students learn to read automatically. Which method do you think will work best?

    In order to help pupils learn to read from sight, teachers can employ a number of methods that have been proved to be successful.

    The chances of learning and growing most effectively are increased in settings where students work in small groups or receive individual attention.

    More time spent with an adult during the process of learning and practising sight words increases the likelihood that the words will be retained in the child's long-term memory.

    The early education programme offered by Dr. Study is individualised to meet the needs of each child.

    As children embark on their first experiences with formal education, we work to ensure that they do so with a sense of excitement and enthusiasm for the subject matter.

    Methods for Introducing Core Words

    Learn the fundamentals of introducing core words using the following:

    • Core word learning relies heavily on repetition. It's important to give kids many chances to read and write a new sight word before moving on to the next one.
    • Use narratives as a means of instruction. Learning and remembering new vocabulary is facilitated when kids experience words in context rather than in isolation.
    • Play music. Singing songs with youngsters that feature sight words encourages them to employ a variety of cognitive processes as they learn.
    • Using word games to aid in memorisation is a lot of fun. The games Concentration Go Fish, and Word Scramble are all fantastic examples of word games.

    Kindergarten vocabulary is used to introduce and reinforce high-use words.

    Focusing on core terms is best accomplished by incorporating their learning into topics that children are currently studying, such as the four seasons, early geography, animals, etc.

    Developing Vocabulary in Early Childhood

    Most people have witnessed babies and toddlers making noises and trying to mimic adult speech, from the first coos and gurgles through the first utterances of landmark words like "Papa” and "Mama”.

    These kinds of noises and attempts are prevalent in homes where there are youngsters present.

    Children's innate capacity to recognise and make sounds that will develop into words and later sentences is demonstrated in their early attempts at communicating with others through speech and listening.

    As soon as they are able to speak, children may interact with one another and the world around them thanks to this skill.

    The emergence of a child's vocabulary is a crucial step towards later language and literacy development.

    Children's Developmental Awareness of Phonemes

    One of the "most compelling and well-established findings in the research on starting reading is the essential association between phonemic awareness and reading acquisition," as stated by Kame'enui et al., 1997.

    Because phonemic awareness is such a crucial foundational reading skill, it is typically taught first in a reading programme.

    Why?

    For the simple reason that learning one's phonemes at a young age paves the way for later success in reading, vocabulary growth, and spelling.

    Teaching Phonics to Young Children

    According to the findings of numerous studies, phonics instruction is crucial for the growth of a child's reading abilities, and "explicit and systematic phonics is preferable to nonsystematic or no phonics."

    It's important to cite this phrase. It has been shown that (2002, Cunningham).

    Teaching phonics to new readers is also crucial because it kickstarts the process of transferring spoken language skills to reading and writing.

    Proficient Reading for Beginning Readers

    A key component of reading fluency is the ability to read text fast and accurately, either quietly or aloud.

    Building a solid foundation in phonics is crucial for students' future success in learning to read and write fluently.

    This is due to the fact that decoding words quickly is an essential component of fluency.

    The ability to read fluently is crucial for the growth of young readers' understanding.

    Early Reading Comprehension

    Comprehension is not just the last but also the most crucial goal of reading and the fifth pillar of reading teaching.

    Decoding and understanding what is read are two aspects of early reading comprehension.

    A traditional adage about teaching reading suggests that kids should focus on it until the third grade, and then they can focus on other subjects.

    Having the ability to understand what is read is crucial for learning and progressing through school.

    Learning First Phrases And Learning To Read

    Children who have learned a large vocabulary are able to create new meanings by putting together words in novel ways.

    Children with Down syndrome can learn to improve their grammatical and lexical fluency through reading.

    Learning First Phrases

    To begin communicating, children usually employ a limited vocabulary. Once kids have a vocabulary of around 100 words, they start using phrase combinations to convey many thoughts at once.

    Expressions like "dog bark”, "all gone,” and  "more meal," and "mummy automobile" are all instances of compound phrases.

    Observational relationships are taught to youngsters through conversation; for example, "the baby is sleeping" can be compared to "the dog is sleeping." Some common ones include "the dog is sleeping" and "the baby is napping."

    It's common practice to use sentences like this as keywords.

    When kids learn new words and concepts, it expands their horizons and strengthens their ability to reason verbally.

    Keywords refer to the most informative and frequently used words (content words).

    Many young children express these things without the grammatical words when they are just starting to talk (function words).

    For instance, one might say "dog sleeping" instead of "the dog is sleeping."

    Eventually, they learn to properly use grammar and language.

    Often, it takes children with Down syndrome a lot longer than typically developing youngsters to master grammar and to develop the ability to communicate using keywords.

    The best method to communicate with children who are experiencing language delay is to use natural language and whole sentences, even if they are only speaking two keyword phrases.

    All signs point to this being the case.

    In most cases, a child will first learn to associate a word with a gesture before learning to link two words together verbally.

    They may first point to a dog and say "bark," but after a few weeks of exposure to the word, they may instead say "dog bark."

    The first and second keyword phases of language acquisition also introduce children to several grammatical markers, such as the  present progressive tense marker 'ing' as in "dog barking,"  “the plural' as in "ducks swim," and the possessive' as in "daddy's shoe”.

    All youngsters, including those with Down syndrome, begin to join two keywords once their vocabularies grow to more than 50 words.

    This will happen for some children with Down syndrome around the age of three, while the development of language abilities varies widely from child to child, and for some kids it won't happen until much later.

    Most kids with Down syndrome will pick up on a couple of crucial phrases eventually, even if they don't use them frequently at first, but that takes time.

    Parental verbal ability influences a kid's word building skills. It may be a crucial role in determining how quickly or slowly children with Down syndrome learn and develop.

    To aid children in improving their communication abilities in this way is likely to be useful.

    The meanings conveyed by children using just two basic sentences can be rather broad.

    Our prior experiences have shown, however, that most children with Down syndrome need extra help learning how to connect words together.

    That's probably because kids with Down syndrome have a harder time catching up linguistically and talking than the average kid.

    early reading2

    Learning to Read

    Many studies have examined the reading processes of children and the reading-related skills that must be mastered before a child may read at an advanced level.

    The ultimate goal is to be able to read material effortlessly while devoting all of your attention to the content, or reading for meaning.

    It usually takes a child quite a few years to reach this level of development.

    Ability to decode printed words on the page and knowledge of the language being read are the two most important prerequisites for reading and understanding what is read.

    On the lookout for a grade school activity? Learning English, Math, Science, and the Humanities has never been easier thanks to Dr. Study's online and in-person programmes for kids.

    Decoding Words

    You can either memorise everything and learn to recognise it by sight, or you can study the connections between letters and sounds and "sound out" an unknown written word using a phonics-based method, which is the latter.

    If you want to be able to read correctly, one strategy is to memorise the appearance of everything in the world. Word study relies heavily on both reading and listening.

    Sight Words

    Children, according to studies, first learn to recognise full words before they learn to recognise the letters that make up those words (this is known as learning to read "by sight").

    Beginning with these fundamentals is the first step in reading.

    This level of reading proficiency is known as the logographic stage.

    In order to learn to read more quickly and with a deeper comprehension of the process, children benefit from mastering a modest sight vocabulary.

    Irregular words are those that cannot be easily decoded by merely "hearing them out," hence learning to read sight words is essential.

    Sight words are a great way to ease into reading, and they're essential for expanding your vocabulary.

    Many English words, like "yacht," "was," "cough," and "through," are good examples of this.

    Phonics

    Learning words by sight is important for beginning readers, but research shows that the sooner kids learn to "sound out" words, the faster they may pick up reading and spelling.

    It is helpful to begin learning to read by memorising individual words.

    Learning to decode words based on the sounds they contain is called phonics.

    A youngster needs to learn the individual sounds of the letters (like s, a, and t) and the possible combinations of those sounds before he or she can begin to read and write (for example, oo, ee, ay).

    The next step for children is to identify the sounds that make up words.

    That words like "cat," "car," and "cook" all begin with the same sound; that "can" and "end" with the same sound; that "cat" becomes "at" when the "c" is removed and "rat" when the "c" is replaced; and so on.

    These are some situations in which you can hear and manipulate phonemes, the smallest audible units in spoken speech. These are all parts of phonological awareness.

    Knowing how to hear and control individual phonemes is more vital for reading than knowing how to identify syllables and rhyme.

    Reading proficiency is strongly correlated with phonological awareness, as evidenced by studies.

    Children who know how to recognise and manipulate phonemes and who have a firm grasp on the relationship between written and spoken sounds will have a much easier time learning to read and write.

    For instance, students can use phonics to figure out how the letters in an unknown word are supposed to sound and then put those sounds together to form a pronounced one.

    In a similar vein, they may analyse the constituent sounds of a word to guess at its possible spelling.

    Phonics is essential for reading and spelling, and it typically takes developing youngsters a number of years to get beyond rote memorisation of letter sounds.

    Reading Comprehension

    Many kids have trouble understanding what they're reading, even though they can decode the words and read the sentences at their age-appropriate reading level.

    Research indicates that insufficient verbal language skills and short-term memory function are the key causes of poor understanding. [Citation needed]

    Learning from Books

    Recent studies have shown that for reading instruction to be most effective, it must explicitly connect the acquisition of both sight words and phonological skills to the acquisition of reading fluency and comprehension from the get-go.

    This guarantees that the kid will have ample time to learn to read, understand, and appreciate literature.

    Reading for meaning and developing a love of reading at a young age will help children understand the value of learning sight words and phonics.

    Enhancing Reading Skills in Down Syndrome Children

    Many studies have found that children with Down syndrome do relatively well in the area of reading.

    When we say that the kids have "strong" reading capabilities, we imply that they are well above and beyond what one would predict from their linguistic and cognitive abilities alone.

    Ten percent of children with Down syndrome can learn to read as well as typically developing children their age, according to studies.

    Many youngsters with Down syndrome will now be able to start reading classes at a young age.

    Although many children with Down syndrome are able to learn to read words by sight rather well, studies suggest that they have a more difficult time acquiring phonics than typically developing youngsters.

    It's probable that the kids are having a harder time acquiring phonics because they have issues with hearing, speech production, and verbal short-term memory.

    There's also the potential that kids with Down syndrome don't have the mental capacity to benefit from phonics instruction.

    However, research suggests that kids with Down syndrome who are able to master phonics early on have a leg up when it comes to reading success (just as is the case for typically developing children).

    Learning a foundational set of sight words may serve as a necessary precursor to studying phonics.

    Research has shown that children with Down syndrome who have a higher sight word vocabulary are better able to learn phonics. [Citation needed]

    In our experience, it can be perplexing to teach young children with Down syndrome about letters and letter sounds before moving on to teaching them to read complete words and knowing that we read for meaning.

    Moreover, some children will learn to recognise and articulate the individual sounds that letters make (for instance, "cat"), but they may struggle to combine those sounds into reading words (cat).

    We recommend waiting until the kid has mastered a 30- to 40-word sight vocabulary and can read and understand simple novels before introducing phonics instruction.

    In this way, the youngster will be able to fully comprehend the ideas offered in the literature.

    Facilitating Language Development Through Reading

    Children with Down syndrome can benefit from learning early sight words through the See and Learn Language and Reading programme.

    Most children with Down syndrome have trouble picking up spoken language simply by listening to it, but studies show that they can make greater gains if they are provided with visual and written aids to their language development.

    Activities like matching and selecting that illustrate and compare brief phrases and sentences containing the words are included in simple books that contain the sight words being taught.

    Parents and teachers are strongly encouraged to check in on their children's development throughout See and Learn Language and Reading to make sure they are grasping the meaning of the words, phrases, and sentences presented.

    The children's comprehension of the reading material is regularly evaluated. Teach youngsters to read for comprehension, not just memorisation of sight words.

    Supporting this normal linguistic growth is the gradual introduction of new words and phrases, from single words through varied constructs employing two keywords, and finally to three keyword sentences.

    This is why the first words and phrases taught in See and Learn Language and Reading are carefully selected to align with the most fundamental phases of language learning.

    Phonics exercises are then introduced in See and Learn Language and Reading to aid in the acquisition of early literacy skills such as letter recognition, sounding out, and blending.

    This is done as the kids' linguistic abilities are being bolstered by the acquisition of foundational sight words and phrases.

    Observe and Learn Teaching kids first language, and subsequently elementary reading abilities, is the goal of the Language and Reading programme.

    The course is designed to teach students how to properly understand and use a wide variety of written and verbal forms.

    Most children with Down syndrome, however, acquire the meanings of words and phrases much more quickly than they learn how to pronounce them.

    It is for this reason that we advocate for parents and educators to keep encouraging their children's linguistic growth at a rate that reflects their level of comprehension, and to not let the children's issues with speech production impede their progress in learning new languages.

    Of course, it's also important to give the kids plenty of chances to practise what they've learned by actually uttering the new words and phrases out loud, and to encourage them to use the new vocabulary they've picked up.

    All the exercises and procedures of the See and Learn Languages programme actively promote this.

    Teaching Speech Skills

    Many kids would benefit from a systematic approach to helping them develop their speech abilities, starting with the basics like sound discrimination and production and working their way up to more complex tasks like forming simple sound combinations and speaking complete phrases with clarity.

    The ability to create speech and the development of language skills may also benefit from speech and language therapy, with some youngsters seeing a speech-language pathologist on a regular basis for this purpose.

    Activities in See and Learn Language and Reading are meant to aid in the development of students' linguistic competence, while the See and Learn Speech programme is meant to aid in the development of participants' articulation skills.

    The See and Learn speech software can be used under the guidance of a speech and language therapist or pathologist, but it is also intuitive enough for use by parents and teachers without outside help.

    Additionally, children with Down syndrome are likely to benefit from frequent, systematic speech practise that is interwoven into their everyday lives at home and in the classroom.

    Reading skills, like those for speaking and writing, can have an effect on one another. The more a child understands, the better he or she can express themselves verbally.

    If you struggle to visualise certain words, reading may be able to help. A child's ability to be understood increases as he or she increases their verbal interaction with others.

    Conversation partners are more inclined to approach someone who's speaking has improved.

    Therefore, the person will have more chances to exercise their vocal chords and learn new words, in addition to more possibilities to increase their general fluency in the English language.

    Development of Reading and Writing Skills

    Children with Down syndrome will nearly always need supplementary aid in language and literacy classes throughout their elementary and secondary school careers.

    There is evidence to suggest that elementary school-aged children with Down syndrome can benefit from a structured approach to reading instruction that combines training in  phoneme awareness, letter-sound knowledge,  and the application of these to spelling (phonics) and reading , and sight word learning, in the context of book reading.

    Improve your English proficiency and self-assurance with the help of Dr. Study's essential English tutoring services.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Some examples of core vocabulary include: stop, go, get, more, turn, mine, on, off, up, down, that. However, even with just these 11 words, a beginning communicator can take control of their environment, have their needs met and interact socially with friends and family.

    To improve students' reading comprehension, teachers should introduce the seven cognitive strategies of effective readers: activating, inferring, monitoring-clarifying, questioning, searching-selecting, summarising, and visualising-organising.

    Core words are usually verbs, adjectives, and pronouns and are less likely to be nouns. By giving AAC learners quick access to these core words, we're providing them with a powerful tool to communicate whatever they want to say.

    Ore vocabulary is more generic and can be used across various environments with communication partners. Fringe vocabulary refers to vocabulary that is more specific to a topic, environment, or individual.

    Essentially, a core board is a colourful board with symbols that are fixed in place. It is known as the 'core vocabulary'. In addition, there are several strips attached at the top, containing specific vocabulary, usually organised into categories such as food, toys, places, and people.

    Last but not least, remember to enjoy the books you read! Select books that will capture your child's attention and make it a habit to read with him or her on a regular basis. Whether you're reading to a child or with a child, the experience should be rewarding for both of you. Though most would agree that kids need to learn how to read, they would disagree on the best way to do so. New research shows that teaching children only a few key words at a young age can help them become better readers. The words "It" "I," "me," "you," "he,"and  "her”  all appear here. By emphasising the teaching of these terms initially, parents and instructors can provide their children a firm grounding in reading.

    early reading1

    Dolch Words

    Core words are sometimes called "Dolch words" in academia and school systems. Foundational words are another name for core words. Kindergarteners and Second and Third Graders are often kept apart.

    The original Dolch Word List was first published in 1948 in Dr. Edward William Dolch's book Problems in Reading. There are 220 entries in this dictionary of everyday English drawn from period children's literature.

    It's true that the nouns weren't among the first Dolch words to be collected. In most cases, an additional list of 95 nouns is appended to the core words list. To name just two, "Santa Claus" and "Christmas" are two of the 95 nouns that Dolch thinks crucial. Dolch's decisions sometimes mirror the prevailing norms of his period.

    Words like "new", "eye," and "down," on Dolch's list are entirely foreign to beginning readers. These words are sometimes referred to as "sight words" because of the emphasis placed on visual recognition and acquisition.

    The sight word list is used in many various ways by teachers, parents, and other carers to help children learn to read. The Dolch word list has become increasingly prevalent in English instruction for students learning English as a second language, despite its initial intent to be used with native English speakers only (ESL).

    Conclusion

    Core words are essential for reading success and are often encountered but challenging to decode using phonics rules. To help pupils learn to read from sight, teachers can employ a number of methods that have been proved to be successful. These include repetition, narratives, music, word games, and kindergarten vocabulary. Core words should be incorporated into topics that children are currently studying, such as the four seasons, early geography, animals, etc. To develop vocabulary in early childhood, it is important to give kids many chances to read and write a new sight word before moving on to the next one. 

    Children's innate capacity to recognise and make sounds that will develop into words and later sentences is demonstrated in their early attempts at communicating with others through speech and listening. Phonemic awareness is a crucial foundational reading skill, and is typically taught first in a reading programme. Phonics instruction is crucial for the growth of a child's reading abilities, and "explicit and systematic phonics is preferable to nonsystematic or no phonics." Teaching phonics to new readers is also crucial because it kickstarts the process of transferring spoken language skills to reading and writing. Proficient reading for beginning readers is the ability to read text fast and accurately, and decoding words quickly is an essential component of fluency. Early reading comprehension is the last goal of reading and the fifth pillar of reading teaching.

    Learning first phrases and learning to read are two aspects of early reading comprehension. Children with Down syndrome can learn to improve their grammatical and lexical fluency through reading, learning first phrases, observing observational relationships, and using keywords. Keywords refer to the most informative and frequently used words, and it takes children with Down syndrome a lot longer than typically developing youngsters to master grammar and to develop the ability to communicate using keywords. The best method to communicate with children with language delay is to use natural language and whole sentences, even if they are only speaking two keyword phrases. All youngsters, including those with Down syndrome, begin to join two keywords once their vocabularies grow to more than 50 words, while the development of language abilities varies widely from child to child. 

    Most kids with Down syndrome will pick up on a couple of crucial phrases eventually, but it takes time to learn how to connect words together. Parental verbal ability plays a crucial role in determining how quickly or slowly children with Down syndrome learn and develop. To improve their communication abilities, it is important to decode printed words on the page and knowledge of the language being read. To learn to read more quickly and with a deeper comprehension of the process, children benefit from mastering a modest sight vocabulary. Learning English, Math, Science, and the Humanities has never been easier thanks to Dr. Study's online and in-person programmes for kids.

    Learning to read sight words is essential for beginning readers, but it is also important to learn to decode words based on the sounds they contain. Phonics is essential for reading and spelling, and it takes typically developing youngsters a number of years to get beyond rote memorisation of letter sounds. Reading proficiency is strongly correlated with phonological awareness, and many kids have trouble understanding what they're reading. Research suggests that insufficient verbal language skills and short-term memory function are the key causes of poor understanding in Down Syndrome children. To improve reading skills, it is important to connect the acquisition of both sight words and phonological skills to the acquisition of reading fluency and comprehension from the get-go.

    Additionally, learning a foundational set of sight words may serve as a necessary precursor to studying phonics. Finally, teaching young children with Down syndrome about letters and letter sounds before moving on to teaching them to read complete words and knowing that we read for meaning is important. The See and Learn Language and Reading programme is designed to help children with Down syndrome acquire knowledge through direct exposure to the world around them. It involves learning early sight words and phonics exercises to aid in the acquisition of early literacy skills such as letter recognition, sounding out, and blending. Parents and teachers are encouraged to check in on their children's development to ensure they are grasping the meaning of the words, phrases, and sentences presented. The course is designed to teach students how to properly understand and use a wide variety of written and verbal forms. 

    Parents and educators should encourage their children's linguistic growth at a rate that reflects their level of comprehension and not let their issues with speech production impede their progress in learning new languages. It is important to give them plenty of chances to practise what they've learned by uttering the new words and phrases out loud, and to encourage them to use the new vocabulary they've picked up. The See and Learn Languages programme actively promotes this, while the See and Learn Speech programme is meant to aid in the development of participants' articulation skills. Additionally, children with Down syndrome are likely to benefit from frequent, systematic speech practise that is interwoven into their everyday lives at home and in the classroom, and supplementary aid in language and literacy classes throughout their elementary and secondary school careers. 

    Research suggests that elementary school-aged children with Down syndrome can benefit from a structured approach to reading instruction that combines training in phoneme awareness, letter-sound knowledge, and sight word learning. Core words such as "It", "I," "me," "you," "he," and "her" can help them become better readers. The Dolch Word List was first published in 1948 in Dr. Edward William Dolch's book Problems in Reading and includes 220 entries drawn from period children's literature. It emphasizes visual recognition and acquisition, and is used by teachers, parents, and other carers to help children learn to read.

    Content Summary

    • For this reason, it is crucial that students learn to read automatically.
    • In order to help pupils learn to read from sight, teachers can employ a number of methods that have been proved to be successful.
    • More time spent with an adult during the process of learning and practising sight words increases the likelihood that the words will be retained in the child's long-term memory.
    • Learn the fundamentals of introducing core words using the following: Core word learning relies heavily on repetition.
    • Because phonemic awareness is such a crucial foundational reading skill, it is typically taught first in a reading programme.
    • For the simple reason that learning one's phonemes at a young age paves the way for later success in reading, vocabulary growth, and spelling.
    • Building a solid foundation in phonics is crucial for students' future success in learning to read and write fluently.
    • The ability to read fluently is crucial for the growth of young readers' understanding.
    • Decoding and understanding what is read are two aspects of early reading comprehension.
    • Children with Down syndrome can learn to improve their grammatical and lexical fluency through reading.
    • To begin communicating, children usually employ a limited vocabulary.
    • When kids learn new words and concepts, it expands their horizons and strengthens their ability to reason verbally.
    • Eventually, they learn to properly use grammar and language.
    • Often, it takes children with Down syndrome a lot longer than typically developing youngsters to master grammar and to develop the ability to communicate using keywords.
    • The best method to communicate with children who are experiencing language delay is to use natural language and whole sentences, even if they are only speaking two keyword phrases.
    • Parental verbal ability influences a kid's word building skills.
    • Many studies have examined the reading processes of children and the reading-related skills that must be mastered before a child may read at an advanced level.
    • Irregular words are those that cannot be easily decoded by merely "hearing them out," hence learning to read sight words is essential.
    • Sight words are a great way to ease into reading, and they're essential for expanding your vocabulary.
    • Learning words by sight is important for beginning readers, but research shows that the sooner kids learn to "sound out" words, the faster they may pick up reading and spelling.
    • It is helpful to begin learning to read by memorising individual words.
    • Learning to decode words based on the sounds they contain is called phonics.
    • Knowing how to hear and control individual phonemes is more vital for reading than knowing how to identify syllables and rhyme.
    • Children who know how to recognise and manipulate phonemes and who have a firm grasp on the relationship between written and spoken sounds will have a much easier time learning to read and write.
    • Phonics is essential for reading and spelling, and it takes typically developing youngsters a number of years to get beyond rote memorisation of letter sounds.
    • Recent studies have shown that for reading instruction to be most effective, it must explicitly connect the acquisition of both sight words and phonological skills to the acquisition of reading fluency and comprehension from the get-go.
    • Reading for meaning and developing a love of reading at a young age will help children understand the value of learning sight words and phonics.
    • Many studies have found that children with Down syndrome do relatively well in the area of reading.
    • Although many children with Down syndrome are able to learn to read words by sight rather well, studies suggest that they have a more difficult time acquiring phonics than typically developing youngsters.
    • Learning a foundational set of sight words may serve as a necessary precursor to studying phonics.
    • We recommend waiting until the kid has mastered a 30- to 40-word sight vocabulary and can read and understand simple novels before introducing phonics instruction.
    • Children with Down syndrome can benefit from learning early sight words through the See and Learn Language and Reading programme.
    • Most children with Down syndrome have trouble picking up spoken language simply by listening to it, but studies show that they can make greater gains if they are provided with visual and written aids to their language development.
    • The children's comprehension of the reading material is regularly evaluated.
    • Teach youngsters to read for comprehension, not just memorisation of sight words.
    • This is why the first words and phrases taught in See and Learn Language and Reading are carefully selected to align with the most fundamental phases of language learning.
    • Phonics exercises are then introduced in See and Learn Language and Reading to aid in the acquisition of early literacy skills such as letter recognition, sounding out, and blending.
    • This is done as the kids' linguistic abilities are being bolstered by the acquisition of foundational sight words and phrases.
    • Teaching kids first language, and subsequently elementary reading abilities, is the goal of the Language and Reading programme.
    • It is for this reason that we advocate for parents and educators to keep encouraging their children's linguistic growth at a rate that reflects their level of comprehension, and to not let the children's issues with speech production impede their progress in learning new languages.
    • Of course, it's also important to give the kids plenty of chances to practise what they've learned by actually uttering the new words and phrases out loud, and to encourage them to use the new vocabulary they've picked up.
    • All the exercises and procedures of the See and Learn Languages programme actively promote this.
    • Activities in See and Learn Language and Reading are meant to aid in the development of students' linguistic competence, while the See and Learn Speech programme is meant to aid in the development of participants' articulation skills.
    • The See and Learn speech software can be used under the guidance of a speech and language therapist or pathologist, but it is also intuitive enough for use by parents and teachers without outside help.
    • Children with Down syndrome will nearly always need supplementary aid in language and literacy classes throughout their elementary and secondary school careers.
    • There is evidence to suggest that elementary school-aged children with Down syndrome can benefit from a structured approach to reading instruction that combines training in  phoneme awareness, letter-sound knowledge,  and the application of these to spelling (phonics) and reading , and sight word learning, in the context of book reading.
    • Last but not least, remember to enjoy the books you read!
    • Select books that will capture your child's attention and make it a habit to read with him or her on a regular basis.
    • Though most would agree that kids need to learn how to read, they would disagree on the best way to do so.
    • New research shows that teaching children only a few key words at a young age can help them become better readers.
    • Foundational words are another name for core words.
    • The original Dolch Word List was first published in 1948 in Dr. Edward William Dolch's book Problems in Reading.
    • There are 220 entries in this dictionary of everyday English drawn from period children's literature.
    • To name just two, "Santa Claus" and "Christmas" are two of the 95 nouns that Dolch thinks crucial.
    • Words like "new", "eye," and "down," on Dolch's list are entirely foreign to beginning readers.
    • These words are sometimes referred to as "sight words" because of the emphasis placed on visual recognition and acquisition.
    • The sight word list is used in many various ways by teachers, parents, and other carers to help children learn to read.
    • The Dolch word list has become increasingly prevalent in English instruction for students learning English as a second language, despite its initial intent to be used with native English speakers only (ESL).
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