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How Do I Motivate My Child To Do Well In School?

(Last Updated On: February 21, 2023)
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    Is it difficult for you to encourage your child to succeed academically? Some suggestions that might help are provided below. First and foremost, you must impress upon them the importance of their grades and how those grades will affect their future.

    If you are not successful, you will not be able to move forwards in your life.

    Here's where parents come in: helping kids set realistic goals for themselves and standing by them when they seem impossible to achieve.

    Find out the most efficient means of motivating your kid to succeed in school. It's possible you already knew the answer, but here it is anyway: everything starts with you.

    First and foremost, your child needs to see that you, himself, place a high value on education if you want him to succeed academically.

    One way to do this is to set a good example for him by pursuing higher education and thereby demonstrating the value of education to your child.

    Students also tend to do better in school when their parents take an active role in their education.

    This involvement can take the form of simple tasks like keeping an eye on their children's homework or more substantial ones like attending parent-teacher conferences.

    These are just a few ideas to help you encourage your child to succeed in an endeavour they previously showed little enthusiasm for, such as going to school and doing well.

    Dr Study provides an early childhood program that is tailored to each child’s needs.

    We make sure that kids enjoy their start to formal education while also building confidence and a love of learning.

    What Motivates Students To Learn?

    Teachers and parents alike recognise the importance of student motivation in fostering success in the classroom and encouraging pupils to develop their full intellectual potential.

    A self-motivated student may, for example, finish their schoolwork before it is due, go beyond what is required of them on their assignments, and offer thoughtful contributions to class debates without being asked.

    Moreover, he or she may be more able to see exam failure not as a reflection of academic failure but as an opportunity to improve in other areas.

    How can we best inspire pupils to learn, and what motivates them to do so, is now the question.

    Various elements, such as the student's interest in the subject matter, the student's earlier achievements in the subject matter, the student's desire to please his or her parents or professors, and the student's personal will to succeed, might encourage the student to do well in school.

    However, motivation is most effective when youngsters also have a positive view of themselves, are assured in their own skills, and know how to tackle problems methodically.

    This is because kids who have a positive view of themselves tend to be happier overall.

    kids-learning

    Looking for a primary school program? Dr. Study offers an online and in-person program that helps kids learn English, Maths, Science and Humanities. 

    Motivation: Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic

    Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation are the two main types of motivation.

    The urge to learn comes from within the person who is intrinsically motivated. Extrinsic motivation refers to the process of encouraging students to learn by introducing an external factor.

    Unlike adults, who can pick and choose what they want to learn about, children are often forced to learn whatever is on the school's required curriculum.

    This may suggest that individuals rely on extrinsic motivation, such as prizes or punishments tied to performance, rather than their own internal drive to excel in a given area of study.

    However, there are steps that may be taken to encourage kids' natural curiosity and drive.

    One Step At A Time

    A student's lack of motivation at school might affect their performance, even if they have a genuine passion for the subject matter.

    This is a widely held belief among college students.

    Younger kids may find it difficult to perceive the large picture and break a task down into logical steps than adults.

    Teachers can aid students by completing part of the necessary work themselves and by arranging assignments in a logical progression.

    Reviewing the work from yesterday, introducing the lesson for today, and mentioning the lesson for tomorrow helps children build strong planning abilities and self-efficacy in learning.

    Another benefit is that it encourages kids to focus on a single activity at a time, which can help them avoid the emotions of being overwhelmed.

    Allow Students to Choose

    Students should be given some control over their educational path, if at all possible.

    Involvement and pride in one's academic accomplishments are both enhanced when the student is the one to take responsibility for his or her own learning.

    Teachers can often make their lessons more engaging and relevant to their students' lives by incorporating real-world examples and stories.

    Even while many educators have a prescribed curriculum, they must cover with their students; they can typically find a way to adapt their lessons to meet the needs of their students.

    It's beneficial to expose young children to a range of instructional styles, as they may find that they learn best through a visual, aural, or kinaesthetic approach.

    It's possible this may be quite useful.

    Students who are struggling academically due to a documented learning disability would benefit greatly from this.

    Teachers should try to be as accommodating and adaptable as possible, as students need to feel successful is a strong motivator for learning.

    Praise Effort Over Results

    If the kid did not do exceptionally well on the assignment, remind them that they tried their hardest and that is what matters.

    Having a good sense of self-worth is important because it allows people to view themselves favourably regardless of their academic achievements.

    Children who have a solid understanding of their own values are more likely to take risks and excel academically.

    In addition, they might find it simpler to celebrate their triumphs and regard their losses as faults with their performance rather than as evidence of their underlying value as persons.

    Learn more about how you may help your pupils grow in self-assurance.

    In addition, when educators place more value on assisting students in strengthening their approach to problem-solving and skill development than on the successful completion of a given assignment, they can help students understand the wider picture and adopt a more healthy attitude to learning.

    Realising that learning is a lifelong endeavour makes it much easier to keep the motivation to learn alive and well.

    Focus Attention Through Engagement

    At school, some children have difficulty concentrating on what's being taught.

    This may be the result of a learning disability such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or of circumstances at home that are causing the individual to experience emotional distress and/or distraction.

    Unfortunately, telling a student to "pay attention" is frequently the least effective way to get them involved in the activity that is being performed.

    Instead, try giving learners freewriting prompts or activities that require them to work in groups to generate their own personal connections to the topic at hand before the start of the lesson.

    Because of this, it will be much simpler for them to interact with the material and retain the information.

    You could also ask students to get up from their seats, walk around the classroom, or carry out some sort of physical activity in order to get their minds and bodies involved in the upcoming lesson.

    A multi-sensory approach, like the one taken by the Touch-type Read and Spell Course, is another fantastic method for accomplishing this goal successfully.

    It involves seeing, hearing, and typing, adding a tactile element to the development of literacy skills as students use the muscle memory in their hands to assist with the mastery of skills such as spelling.

    Assess Progress And Set Realistic Goals

    Individuals are more likely to maintain their learning motivation and achieve their goals if they have specific milestones based on their past achievements. Teachers, parents, and students all benefit from having a common forum for discussing students' accomplishments, tracking their growth, and planning for the future.

    Teaching your kids to maintain a notebook or folder where they may document their progress can make this job much easier.

    Another helpful technique is to schedule regular check-in sessions and have discussions with students about how they feel about their development.

    It's a way for them to have input right from the start of the decision-making procedure.

    Remember that no two kids will have the same preferred method of learning.

    If a student is slipping behind or not making enough progress, it may be best to bring in a private tutor to work with them one-on-one and give them the necessary direct support.

    This might help if the kid is lagging behind in class or isn't making enough progress.

    Motivation and Self-Directed Learning

    kids-at-school

    Through self-directed learning, students are encouraged to take an active, rather than a passive, role in time management and the assessment of their own development.

    There is no external pressure to perform or fulfil deadlines, thus intrinsic motivation can flourish.

    The pace of the class and the amount of material covered at each meeting are both set by the students.

    Motivating results can be achieved with a self-directed method that nonetheless adheres to the broad strokes of a course format.

    Students that have learning difficulties can benefit from over-learning, thus this is an important point to keep in mind.

    This means that people can take the same lesson as many times as they choose without fear of looking behind their peers.

    Self-directed learning can be difficult to implement in a traditional classroom context but may be more manageable outside of school hours.

    Tips For Motivating Kids To Get Good Grades

    The academic achievement of one's child is a goal shared by all parents. Determine if a reward system might help your kids succeed academically and learn how you can help them succeed.

    All parents wish for their children to succeed in school.

    As parents, we want our kids to achieve well in life, therefore we'll frequently go to great lengths to ensure they do well in school.

    We all want our children to succeed in school, regardless of how we felt about our own educational experiences as youngsters.

    Although many parents want their children to succeed academically, many wonder how much assistance is appropriate. Do you want us to assist you with your homework? Do we reward kids who keep their grades up?

    How to Assist Your Child in Getting Better Grades

    Though we should always have high standards for our kids, it's important to keep things in perspective. Reassure your kids that you believe in them and their abilities by offering to help them out with their academics and projects when they need it.

    However, make sure you aren't expecting too much. Setting high standards for one's child is important, but doing so to the point that the child feels unduly stressed out is usually counterproductive.

    Facilitate the completion of schoolwork. Setting up a specific area for homework and providing help can be quite beneficial. Sometimes, just listening to your child while they think through an issue is all that's needed to help them with their schoolwork. In itself, showing enthusiasm is a valuable contribution.

    Asking questions like "What do you think?" that encourages thought without demanding an answer can also be helpful. You can still help your child by asking open-ended questions about their schoolwork even if the topics covered are beyond anything you learned in school.

    Appreciation should be balanced with encouragement. A lot of attention has been paid recently to the distinctions between encouraging and praising someone. Positive reinforcement that specifically describes the results of the effort is far more effective than generic compliments like "nice work" or "well done."

    Giving your child particular praise as part of a positive parenting method is helpful because it allows you to explain to your child why his action was great. More personalised words of encouragement will be remembered by him than a generic "nice work."

    Parents need not resort to bribing a youngster whose motivation comes from within. Most parents want to instil "intrinsic motivation" in their offspring. Meaning, we want our kids to be motivated to do well in school and work hard even when they aren't being recognised or rewarded in any way.

    By the time they enter school, many children already have a good dosage of intrinsic motivation; it is our duty to preserve this. Whether it's cleaning the kitchen or completing a challenging project at work, parents may best encourage their kids to be self-motivated by working towards goals themselves.

    When a youngster who is naturally motivated is also offered material prizes for good grades, the child is more likely to start depending on the benefits and eventually stop trying to achieve good marks unless they know they will receive a reward. It's less likely that a child who is extrinsically motivated will develop an internal drive to succeed. Offering prizes is unnecessary if your child is genuinely motivated, and it may have the opposite impact.

    kids-school

    Is your youngster finding the Senior years difficult? Dr Study is a Senior School Tutoring in Melbourne that can help them focus on what's important and get the grades they need to get into the college or university of their dreams.

    You might offer your child the chance to earn time with you to engage in an activity of the child's choice as a substitute for receiving tangible products if the youngster maintains good grades. That's the best possible reward for almost every. The challenge is that your child shouldn't have to earn your undivided attention for an extracurricular activity by doing well in school. On the contrary, this should be a regular occurrence.

    If you want to motivate your child to do well in school, how do you choose the best approach? Here are a few points to keep in mind:

    • Motivating your youngster further with prizes is unneeded if he or she is already motivated by internal factors.
    • Keep material incentives for improving grades as a last resort and make it clear that they will only be used once.
    • Think about substituting quality time with you for a material price.
    • Be consistent in praising your kid whenever he or she tries anything new. A regular schedule for this is necessary.

    Each household must determine its own approach to positive reinforcement. Your neighbours and relatives may have a different opinion than you do on some matters. You should have a plan ready for when your kid or other people ask questions about this so that you may confidently answer their enquiries.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    It is difficult to get interested in doing anything that you deem pointless. Some parents try to motivate their kids by telling them that it is important to study hard and get good grades so that they will eventually be successful. ... Thus, they may not able to recognise the importance of studying.

    While as a parent it's important to make sure your child's homework is completed, it's important to not force your child to do it. Instead, focus on making study time a positive experience so your child can build self-motivation to get it completed on time.

    These kids have little interest in most activities and no sense of curiosity about the world. They are rather passive and enjoy activities that require little effort. They expect to be entertained or be given things to keep them busy and happy.

    Students may be motivated by their interest in a topic, their prior success in a specific subject, their desire to please parents or teachers, or their drive to succeed.

    Pay attention to the strengths and limitations of each of your students. Reward their strengths and strengthen their weaknesses. If possible, set your room in a U-shape to encourage student interaction. Vary your instructional strategies; use lectures, demonstrations, discussions, case studies, groups, and more.

    Conclusion

    Parents can help their children achieve academic success by stressing the value of hard work and setting attainable objectives. They should also show leadership by continuing their own education and being involved in their kids' schooling. This can be in the form of checking in on homework or it can involve more serious commitments like showing up to parent-teacher conferences. Students can't learn effectively or grow to their full potential if they aren't intrinsically motivated. Whether or not a student does well in school depends on factors such as their level of interest in the material, their prior accomplishments, their desire to please their parents or teachers, and their own drive.

    Young people are more likely to be motivated when they have a healthy sense of self-worth, confidence in their abilities, and the ability to approach challenges in a methodical fashion. Extrinsic motivation, on the other hand, comes from outside sources. The process of encouraging students to learn by introducing an external factor is called extrinsic motivation, while intrinsic motivation originates from within the person who is intrinsically motivated. Taking things slowly, letting students choose their own educational path, and providing relevant examples and stories are all effective strategies for fostering kids' innate curiosity and motivation. Young children benefit from being introduced to different teaching methods, as they may discover that they retain information best when it is presented visually, aurally, or through physical activity.

    It is important for educators to be flexible and open to student needs so that they can help their students achieve their academic goals and grow in confidence. They should emphasise the importance of problem-solving and skill development over the completion of a specific task, and praise effort over results. You can also accomplish your goal by using a multi-sensory method, such as the Touch-type Read and Spell Course. Maintaining motivation and self-directed learning requires regular assessment of progress and setting attainable goals. Shared spaces where educators, parents, and students can reflect on and celebrate student success while also monitoring development and plotting for the future are invaluable.

    With the self-directed learning approach, students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning and time management. Although challenging to implement in a standard classroom setting, it could be more manageable outside of the regular school day. Parents should learn how to motivate their children to do well in school and consider whether or not a reward system would be beneficial. Parents can show their children they have faith in them and their abilities by offering academic support when their children ask for it. Last but not least, while it's important to hold a child to high standards, doing so to the point where the child feels excessive stress is typically counterproductive.

    Content Summary

    • First and foremost, you must impress upon them the importance of their grades and how those grades will affect their future.
    • Find out the most efficient means of motivating your kid to succeed in school.
    • One way to do this is to set a good example for him by pursuing higher education and thereby demonstrating the value of education to your child.
    • Students also tend to do better in school when their parents take an active role in their education.
    • These are just a few ideas to help you encourage your child to succeed in an endeavour they previously showed little enthusiasm for, such as going to school and doing well.
    • Teachers and parents alike recognise the importance of student motivation in fostering success in the classroom and encouraging pupils to develop their full intellectual potential.
    • Self-motivated student may, for example, finish their schoolwork before it is due, go beyond what is required of them on their assignments, and offer thoughtful contributions to class debates without being asked.
    • Moreover, he or she may be more able to see exam failure not as a reflection of academic failure but as an opportunity to improve in other areas.
    • How can we best inspire pupils to learn, and what motivates them to do so, is now the question.
    • Various elements, such as the student's interest in the subject matter, the student's earlier achievements in the subject matter, the student's desire to please his or her parents or professors, and the student's personal will to succeed, might encourage the student to do well in school.
    • The urge to learn comes from within the person who is intrinsically motivated.
    • Extrinsic motivation refers to the process of encouraging students to learn by introducing an external factor.
    • Unlike adults, who can pick and choose what they want to learn about, children are often forced to learn whatever is on the school's required curriculum.
    • This may suggest that individuals rely on extrinsic motivation, such as prizes or punishments tied to performance, rather than their own internal drive to excel in a given area of study.
    • A student's lack of motivation at school might affect their performance, even if they have a genuine passion for the subject matter.
    • Students should be given some control over their educational path, if at all possible.
    • Involvement and pride in one's academic accomplishments are both enhanced when the student is the one to take responsibility for his or her own learning.
    • Teachers can often make their lessons more engaging and relevant to their student's lives by incorporating real-world examples and stories.
    • Even while many educators have a prescribed curriculum they must cover with their students, they can typically find a way to adapt their lessons to meet the needs of their students.
    • It's beneficial to expose young children to a range of instructional styles, as they may find that they learn best through a visual, aural, or kinaesthetic approach.
    • Teachers should try to be as accommodating and adaptable as possible, as students need to feel successful is a strong motivator for learning.
    • If the kid did not do exceptionally well on the assignment, remind them that they tried their hardest and that is what matters.
    • Having a good sense of self-worth is important because it allows people to view themselves favourably regardless of their academic achievements.
    • Children who have a solid understanding of their own values are more likely to take risks and excel academically.
    • Realising that learning is a lifelong endeavour makes it much easier to keep the motivation to learn alive and well.
    • At school, some children have difficulty concentrating on what's being taught.
    • A multi-sensory approach, like the one taken by the Touch-type Read and Spell Course, is another fantastic method for accomplishing this goal successfully.
    • It involves seeing, hearing, and typing, adding a tactile element to the development of literacy skills as students use the muscle memory in their hands to assist with the mastery of skills such as spelling.
    • Individuals are more likely to maintain their learning motivation and achieve their goals if they have specific milestones based on their past achievements.
    • Teachers, parents, and students all benefit from having a common forum for discussing students' accomplishments, tracking their growth, and planning for the future.
    • Teaching your kids to maintain a notebook or folder where they may document their progress can make this job much easier.
    • Another helpful technique is to schedule regular check-in sessions and have discussions with students about how they feel about their development.
    • It's a way for them to have input right from the start of the decision-making procedure.
    • Remember that no two kids will have the same preferred method of learning.
    • If a student is slipping behind or not making enough progress, it may be best to bring in a private tutor to work with them one-on-one and give them the necessary direct support.
    • This might help if the kid is lagging behind in class or isn't making enough progress.
    • Through self-directed learning, students are encouraged to take an active, rather than a passive, role in time management and the assessment of their own development.
    • The pace of the class and the amount of material covered at each meeting are both set by the students.
    • Motivating results can be achieved with a self-directed method that nonetheless adheres to the broad strokes of a course format.
    • Self-directed learning can be difficult to implement in a traditional classroom context but may be more manageable outside of school hours.
    • The academic achievement of one's child is a goal shared by all parents.
    • Determine if a reward system might help your kids succeed academically and learn how you can help them succeed.
    • All parents wish for their children to succeed in school.
    • Reassure your kids that you believe in them and their abilities by offering to help them out with their academics and projects when they need it.
    • Facilitate the completion of schoolwork.
    • Setting up a specific area for homework and providing help can be quite beneficial.

     

    Frequently Asked Questions

    They will be more motivated when pursuing activities they enjoy. Observe your kids to discover where their interests lie. Show interest in their interests, even if those enthusiams differ from what you would like them to be interested in.

    If your child refuses to go to school, or you're supporting another parent or child in this situation, here's how you can respond:
    1. Ask for help. ...
    2. Consider possible triggers. ...
    3. Take a kind but firm approach. ...
    4. Give clear and consistent messages. ...
    5. Set clear routines on days off school. ...
    6. Engage the system.
    Motivating the Unmotivated Child
    1. Lack of Motivation is a Form of Resistance. ...
    2. All Kids are Motivated by Something. ...
    3. Kids Resist Because They Lack Problem-Solving Skills. ...
    4. Don't Argue or Fight With Your Child About Motivation. ...
    5. Be Clear, Calm, and Give Consequences for Your Child's Behavior. ...
    6. Give Effective Consequences.
    And there are a number of things parents can do to help motivate kids to try harder.
    1. Get involved. ...
    2. Use reinforcement. ...
    3. Reward effort rather than outcome. ...
    4. Help them see the big picture. ...
    5. Let them make mistakes. ...
    6. Get outside help. ...
    7. Make the teacher your ally. ...
    8. Get support for yourself.

    One of the most common reasons that kids lack motivation is trouble with academic skills. They might have a learning disorder, a language disorder, or difficulty with executive functions. The issue could also be an underlying mental health challenge like ADHD, anxiety, depression or OCD.

    Author

    • Dr. Olga Abeysekera

      Olga has a PhD in Management from Monash University. Her research focused on how personal differences and social networking impact creativity in the tech industry. She has extensive teaching experience at universities and private tutoring centers, praised for her engaging methods and clear insights. Olga also writes for top academic journals and creates innovative programs that enhance skills and consulting methods. She believes in the power of education to inspire ongoing growth in both studies and careers.

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