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Why Are Listening Skills Important For Students?

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    It's common knowledge that the ability to listen attentively is crucial to success in both your personal and professional life. However, instructing students in the art of attentive listening can be difficult. Here are some guidelines to help you get going.

    One of the most crucial considerations when instructing students in the art of listening is that different people learn in different ways.

    In the classroom, some students may learn better with the help of visual aids, while others might learn more effectively through hands-on activities. Make sure your teaching fits the needs of your students.

    Be sure to stress the value of attentive listening as well. Listening attentively and making an effort to comprehend the other person's position are essential components of polite conversation.

    Finally, don't rush things. It could be a while before your students notice any improvements. In Dr Study, we want your child to succeed, and our tutoring programs have been proven to help students reach their full potential. With over 30,000 happy students, you can trust that we know what we're doing.

    The Advantages Of Teaching Children To Listen

    Just why is it important for educators to help students develop active listening skills? You might think the answer is obvious, but there are some unexpected benefits to encouraging students to learn how to listen carefully.

    Students who are able to pay close attention in class, for example, not only retain more of what they hear, but also feel less unprepared and frustrated overall. Improving a student's listening skills can also boost their self-efficacy, or confidence in their own ability to succeed academically.

    This means that students who work to improve their listening skills are more likely to report feeling confident, at ease, and ready to succeed academically. Since the ability to listen is so highly prized by educators, this is not surprising.

    Listening skills are a prerequisite for developing effective oral communication skills, which students who put in the time to develop can master. A student's ability to reflect and think critically about a topic before responding improves as they gain knowledge through attentive listening.

    Furthermore, teaching active listening skills can aid the second language acquisition of your class's dual language learners. The social and emotional growth of a person is directly linked to their capacity for active listening.

    Students who regularly practise active listening tend to think more deliberately about what they are hearing, which can reduce stress and improve mood.

    It can also help students build relationships with one another, as students' participation in conversation increases the likelihood that their peers will see them as open and interested. Last but not least, active listening can aid students in cultivating empathy, a trait that can benefit them in and out of the classroom.

    How to Encourage Students to Improve Their Active Listening Skills

    On average, people only use a small fraction of their listening abilities. Despite the fact that most educators recognise the importance of teaching students to listen carefully, this skill is rarely emphasised in the classroom.

    You should make teaching students to be attentive listeners a priority. It's easier to pay attention and listen when there are fewer things competing for your attention.

    It is recommended that you limit the number of potentially distracting classroom decorations, such as numerous posters or overly large and bright objects. All of your students, including those with conditions like ADD or ADHD that make it hard for them to focus and pay attention, will benefit from this (ADHD).

    If your students have trouble staying focused in class, you might try implementing a multisensory curriculum. Multisensory learning refers to the process of acquiring knowledge that makes use of more than one sensory modality at once (such as sight, hearing, or smell).

    Teaching the names of the planets in the solar system through song is one example; another is having students draw a scene from a book as you read it aloud.

    These two exercises are excellent ways to get students interested in and involved in the material being covered. Students' ability to pay attention in class and understand what they hear and read improves when teachers engage more than one of their senses.

    Finally, be an exemplary leader. Students can learn by watching and imitating the teacher's own active listening skills during classroom meetings. Content, which may include anything from school policies to discussions of the latest academic developments, is less important than the meeting's structure.

    Encourage the students to work on their active listening skills and to give more thought to the ideas of their peers before responding to them.

    Why listening skills are important

    Five Crucial English Language Learners Listening Skills

    The Reasons Why Listening Is So Vital

    It should be easy to grasp the significance of listening when one considers that it occupies about 45 percent of the time adults spend talking to one another.

    Significantly higher than the percentages assigned to the three other most common forms of communication (30%), the two most common forms of written communication (16%), and numeric computation (9%).

    Nonetheless, despite the importance of the subject matter, students and even teachers often fail to give it the attention it deserves.

    When you consider that many ESL learners rank listening as their top challenge, this achievement takes on added significance.

    English Learners' Listening Challenges

    There are a number of obstacles that listeners of a foreign language may face when trying to understand a talk, lecture, or conversation (and sometimes even in their first language).

    These difficulties may originate from the speaker, the situation, or the listener.

    A number of factors contribute to a listener's difficulty in understanding a speaker, including the speaker's rapid speech, the presence of background noise, the lack of visual clues (such as when using the telephone), the listener's limited vocabulary, their lack of knowledge of the topic, and their inability to differentiate between individual sounds.

    Though the challenges presented by the speaker or the circumstances may be out of the learner's control, there are a few skills or "strategies" that can be used to help the learner.

    Speculating on the Content

    Let's pretend you've just turned on the TV in your living room. You see a businessman in a suit standing in front of a world map with the sun, clouds, and thunder all represented by appropriate symbols. What do you anticipate him saying next, and what leads you to this conclusion?

    It's very likely that this is going to be a weather forecast. The weather is likely to be described using terms like "sunny," "windy," and "overcast." It'll be cold to begin the day," "there will be showers in the afternoon," etc. will likely be overheard as people talk about the future.

    The context of a conversation or report, be it a newscast, a university lecture, or a casual encounter in the grocery store, can often give clues as to the vocabulary and delivery style the speaker will use.

    Given our extensive prior experience, we are able to foresee the kinds of data that will most likely be presented to us.

    In addition, our ability to fully comprehend what we are hearing depends on our ability to correctly anticipate the topic of a discussion or conversation and "activate" all of the relevant vocabulary that our brains have stored.

    Exercise Your Ability to Anticipate Content:

    Make time to sit back and enjoy a YouTube video or previously recorded TV show. A pause should be taken after every pair of sentences. Try to guess what is going to happen or what the speaker is going to say next.

    Before taking a test that requires you to listen to material, it's a good idea to review the questions and figure out what you'll need to focus on in advance. To answer a question that begins "How many...", for instance, you should look for a specific numerical value.

    Listening For Gist

    Just pretend for a second that you're a superhero with superhuman flight abilities. One can get a good look at the entire area, including the population distribution and housing types, from that height.

    You can also get the "whole picture" by listening to something, but the information is presented in a different order, making it more difficult to absorb all of it at once. You can use the nouns, adjectives, and verbs contained within that chain of descriptions to help shape an image in your head. Getting the gist is shorthand for this level of listening.

    Millions of students around the world struggle with academics. Dr. Study provides a variety of online learning and tutoring programs to assist your child to get ahead.

    Practise Listening For Gist:

    To learn more about a topic, watch a short video with subtitles. The title will give you a good idea of what to expect from the rest of the text; after reading it, give careful attention to the words.

    Listen to it again with the subtitles turned on. When you first read it, how much did you grasp? Try watching the video again after a week and see how much better you did.

    It's easier to remember new vocabulary if you classify it with other words that have similar meanings and functions. Again, mind maps are useful tools in this kind of circumstance.

    Finding the Signposts to Follow

    There are directional markers in language that serve the same purpose as road signs: they help us keep track of what we are hearing. These connective phrases help us understand the speaker and the path they are laying out for us. In the context of talks and presentations, they are crucial.

    For instance, a professor could begin a lecture by saying, "I'm going to talk about three things that are contributing to global warming..."

    After this point in the presentation, they may use transitional phrases like "first of all," "moving on to," and "in summary" to signal when they are changing topics. Many other phrases and terms can also serve the same purpose.

    Example: "to put it another way," "to provide examples," "to illustrate this," etc. Check out the examples in the list of words and phrases that follows.

    Exercise Your Ability to Spot Signpost Language:

    Most textbooks written specifically for ESL students will have both an audio CD and a written transcript of the material.

    Discover an example of a business presentation or lecture, and see how many directional phrases you can identify (listen more than once, if necessary). After that, review the audio script alongside your notes.

    Keep a notebook where you can write down useful phrases that will serve as guides, and add to it as you learn them.

    Listening For Details

    Imagine you are a detective instead of a superhero, and you are looking into the suspicious buildings you saw earlier. This time, instead of taking in the big picture, you'll be looking for a specific item and eliminating all possibilities except those that fit your criteria.

    When you listen for details, you pay close attention to specific pieces of information, like a name, number, or object.

    Again, you need not pay attention to anything that doesn't seem to apply to you. By doing so, you can zero in on specific results that are relevant to your needs.

    Listen for words like "old," "young," "years," "date of birth," etc., that are associated with age, or a number that could be interpreted as the person's age if you are being asked to write down their age on a listening test. During a conversation, you could wait for someone to begin a question with "How old are you..."

    Exercise Your Ability To Pay Attention To Particulars:

    Select programmes that you know will help you hone your listening skills in the areas you've decided to focus on. For instance, you could tune in to the local weather report or keep up with the sports headlines to get the latest information.

    If you're taking a test, you should skim the questions, underline key words, and figure out what kinds of details you'll need to find in the listening passage as soon as you get the test booklet. This will get you ready for the exam.

    Inferring the significance of something.

    Suppose you are a tourist in a foreign country whose language you do not know. It's not uncommon for a server to apologise when you hand them your credit card to pay the bill at a restaurant.

    While you may not be able to make out every word he's saying, it's probably safe to assume that he's telling you that the restaurant doesn't take credit cards and that you'll need to pay with cash instead.

    Inferring meaning is a strategy for deciphering a message by drawing on context clues and personal experience.

    The use of the words "homework" and "exams" in the same sentence strongly implies that we are eavesdropping on a conversation between a student and his teacher. We understand what is being said, who is saying it, and what is happening because we use context and our experience to fill in the blanks.

    Exercise Your Ability to Infer Meaning:

    Look up a scene from a popular TV show like "Friends" on YouTube. Let's skip the viewing and go straight to the audio, shall we?

    How much information about the situation, the speakers, and their relationship can you gather from their words alone? You shouldn't just listen to the clip again; you should watch it now. Were you successful in making the right decisions?

    If you hear a word you don't know, try to guess its meaning based on the surrounding sentences or events. It's okay if you try again and still don't get it. The old adage, "practise makes perfect," is true for just about everything.

    Do you remember being compelled to go to school and listen to lengthy lectures? If you're like most people, class lectures were difficult to focus on and keep your attention on.

    We weren't disinterested in what was being discussed; rather, we lacked the skills necessary to pay close attention and retain the information being presented.

    It is crucial that students devote considerable time and effort to honing their listening abilities. It's beneficial to them in the classroom, but it's also useful in other areas, like their personal lives.

    Today's post will discuss several of the many compelling arguments for the importance of teaching students to become effective listeners. We'll also give them pointers on how to become a better listener. Okay, so let's get going!

    What Sets Active Listening Apart From Passive Listening?

    Before we get into why it's so important to teach listening skills, let's define what we mean by "effective listening skills." Positive and negative aspects of listening abilities can be better understood through the lens of the distinction between active and passive listening.

    When we actively listen, we focus on the speaker and their message rather than on how we might respond. One of the hallmarks of respect is undivided attention, so that one can learn as much as possible from the person who is speaking.

    Waiting one's turn in a classroom discussion and considering what one's peers have to say before voicing one's own opinion is an example of active listening. Doing so would be a great illustration of your ability to concentrate.

    On the other hand, multitasking while listening is akin to passive listening. Some passive listeners may focus on the speaker so that they can respond, while others may split their attention between the speaker and something else.

    A textbook case of dozing off in class? A student who does homework during story time or a lecture, texts during class, or interrupts others to voice an opinion is probably not an active listener.

    Implementing strategies that encourage active listening and limit the amount of its passive counterpart are important ways to assist students in doing well in class.

    Active listening is listening with the intention of understanding and analysing what the speaker is saying. Even if they disagree with the speaker, the listener is still able to draw their own conclusions from what they hear.

    In order to be an active listener, it is not necessary to agree with the speaker's viewpoint. You could be sitting in class, listening to a lecture, but not quite grasping the concept being discussed.

    That doesn't mean you aren't listening carefully. If you still don't understand the concept, this just means you need more background information.

    You showed keen interest in what was being said, but clarification and explanation in simpler terms were required.

    When someone listens to you passively, it indicates that doing so is not their primary focus but rather a means to an end. Taking notes during a lecture is like sending a text message in the middle of a discussion.

    The learner in this scenario can hear the speaker and may even be able to repeat what they say, but these abilities are sensory in nature and do not prove that the learner has understood what was said.

    Knowing the distinctions between the two will help you target your efforts towards improving listening skills in the right areas.

    Child listening skills

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    The ability to focus on what another person is saying is a skill that is often undervalued.

    But the truth is that one needs strong listening skills to succeed in both their personal and professional lives.

    Students who practise attentive listening and understanding will be better equipped to handle conflict, negotiate agreements, build meaningful relationships, and succeed in any field they choose.

    We hope that this article has helped you realise the value of good listening skills and motivated you to work on improving them.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    It can help you to navigate through difficult conversations. But, more than that, it helps improve overall communication, builds a better understanding and ultimately leads to better relationships with family, friends and co-workers.

    • Investigate possible reasons for his listening difficulty. 
    • Seat the student to optimise understanding.
    • Gain the student's attention before speaking with him.
    • Monitor his understanding. 
    • Encourage the student to tell you when he is confused.

    First, listeners cannot control the speed of speech. The biggest problem with listening comprehension is that listeners cannot control how quickly speakers talk. Second, listeners cannot have words repeated, which can cause critical difficulties for them. Third, students cannot replay a recording section.

    Contributing factors include the speaker talking quickly, background noise, a lack of visual clues (such as on the telephone), the listener's limited vocabulary, a lack of knowledge of the topic, and an inability to distinguish individual sounds.

    Listening thoroughly and analytically makes reconstructing a situation easier and finding a solution rationally. It will then lead to optimal decisions. Especially when it comes to decision making, Analytical Listening is a large part of a leadership skill set.

    Conclusion

    Listening attentively is a skill that will serve you well in your personal and professional life, but teaching it can be challenging. Teachers can make a difference by focusing on individual students, reinforcing the significance of active listening, and avoiding unnecessary haste. The stress and depression of dual language learners can be alleviated and their second language acquisition facilitated by instruction in active listening skills. In order to develop relationships with others and increase their capacity for empathy, English Language Learners need to develop their listening skills. Teaching students to pay close attention in class should be a top priority; to that end, teachers should minimise visual distractions and embrace a multisensory approach to instruction.

    Teachers should also set a good example as leaders by urging their students to develop their ability to actively listen to and consider the points made by their classmates before responding. About 45 percent of the time people spend communicating with one another is spent simply listening to one another, highlighting the significance of this activity. Listening for ESL Students Problems can arise when trying to understand someone who is speaking quickly, when there is too much background noise, when there aren't enough visual clues, when you don't know enough about the subject, or when you can't distinguish between different sounds. However, there are methods that can aid the student, such as making educated guesses about the material, imagining what a future conversation might be about, and practising the appropriate vocabulary. It is helpful to look over the test questions ahead of time to get a sense of what you'll need to know.

    The term "listening for gist" is commonly used to describe this type of attentiveness. Watching a short video and then listening to it again with the subtitles turned on is an effective way to learn more about a topic. Grouping new words with others that have similar meanings and uses can help you remember them. It is also crucial to locate the directional indicators. Connective phrases allow us to better comprehend the speaker and the road they are paving for us.

    In order to improve their listening skills, ESL students should practise listening for signpost language, listening for details, paying attention to specific pieces of information, and choosing programmes that will help them do so. In addition, as soon as they receive the test booklet, they should skim the questions, underline key words, and anticipate the types of information they will need to find in the listening passage. Teaching students to become effective listeners is a top priority, and this text devotes considerable space to explaining why and providing strategies for doing so. If someone says "homework" and "exams" in the same sentence, for example, you can use context clues and your own experience to figure out what they mean. This is an example of active listening. You can also practise your ability to Infer Meaning by going to YouTube and searching for a scene from a well-known TV show like "Friends," then attempting to deduce its meaning from contextual cues such as the sentences and events immediately preceding and following the scene.

    "Practise makes perfect" is an adage that rings true in almost every situation. Focusing solely on the speaker and their message is passive listening; active listening entails actively seeking to comprehend and evaluate what is being said. In order to help students succeed in class, it is crucial to implement strategies that promote active listening and reduce the amount of passive listening that takes place. There are two main takeaways from this article: first, that one need not agree with the speaker in order to be an active listener; and second, that taking notes during a lecture is no guarantee that one has understood the material being presented. When you understand the differences between the two, you can more precisely train your ears to listen. Students who put these skills to use will be better prepared to deal with conflict, negotiate agreements, build relationships that last, and achieve success in any field they pursue.

    Content Summary

    • It's common knowledge that the ability to listen attentively is crucial to success in both your personal and professional life.
    • However, instructing students in the art of attentive listening can be difficult.
    • Here are some guidelines to help you get going.
    • Make sure your teaching fits the needs of your students.
    • Be sure to stress the value of attentive listening as well.
    • Furthermore, teaching active listening skills can aid the second language acquisition of your class's dual language learners.
    • You should make teaching students to be attentive listeners a priority.
    • Students can learn by watching and imitating the teacher's own active listening skills during classroom meetings.
    • Encourage the students to work on their active listening skills and to give more thought to the ideas of their peers before responding to them.
    • When you consider that many ESL learners rank listening as their top challenge, this achievement takes on added significance.
    • There are a number of obstacles that listeners of a foreign language may face when trying to understand a talk, lecture, or conversation (and sometimes even in their first language).These difficulties may originate from the speaker, the situation, or the listener.
    • Though the challenges presented by the speaker or the circumstances may be out of the learner's control, there are a few skills or "strategies" that can be used to help the learner.
    • To learn more about a topic, watch a short video with subtitles.
    • Listen to it again with the subtitles turned on.
    • There are directional markers in language that serve the same purpose as road signs: they help us keep track of what we are hearing.
    • Check out the examples in the list of words and phrases that follows.
    • Discover an example of a business presentation or lecture, and see how many directional phrases you can identify (listen more than once, if necessary).
    • When you listen for details, you pay close attention to specific pieces of information, like a name, number, or object.
    • Listen for words like "old," "young," "years," "date of birth," etc.,
    • Suppose you are a tourist in a foreign country whose language you do not know.
    • Inferring meaning is a strategy for deciphering a message by drawing on context clues and personal experience.
    • Look up a scene from a popular TV show like "Friends" on YouTube.
    • It is crucial that students devote considerable time and effort to honing their listening abilities.
    • Today's post will discuss several of the many compelling arguments for the importance of teaching students to become effective listeners.
    • Positive and negative aspects of listening abilities can be better understood through the lens of the distinction between active and passive listening.
    • On the other hand, multitasking while listening is akin to passive listening.
    • Implementing strategies that encourage active listening and limit the amount of its passive counterpart are important ways to assist students in doing well in class.
    • Active listening is listening with the intention of understanding and analysing what the speaker is saying.
    • Even if they disagree with the speaker, the listener is still able to draw their own conclusions from what they hear.
    • In order to be an active listener, it is not necessary to agree with the speaker's viewpoint.
    • That doesn't mean you aren't listening carefully.
    • Taking notes during a lecture is like sending a text message in the middle of a discussion.
    • Knowing the distinctions between the two will help you target your efforts towards improving listening skills in the right areas.
    • But the truth is that one needs strong listening skills to succeed in both their personal and professional lives.
    • We hope that this article has helped you realise the value of good listening skills and motivated you to work on improving them.
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