(03) 9590 6000 | info@drstudylearning.com.au

dr study white background
i
It is a face-to-face or online assessment for students to develop the right programme for them, and to find the right tutors for them.
students online1

How To Teach Reading To Students Online?

Table of Contents
    Add a header to begin generating the table of contents

    The best way for teachers to prepare their students for online learning is to learn to adapt to new kinds of education, rather than trying to modify their current methods to fit the online learning environment. Listed below are some tips and tricks for implementing an online reading curriculum:

    When teaching reading online, keep things as simple and basic as possible for the sake of the students.

    Keep to a single task at a time and concentrate on a single reading during the course of the lessons.

    In the long run, it would be helpful for everyone if your pupils spent more time reading, and this more rigorous method could help them do just that.

    In addition, this can help students enhance both their reading fluency and their understanding.

    Make sure your classroom is always a fun and interesting place to learn.

    One of the most critical features of online reading instruction is the capacity to keep students engaged and involved in the lessons.

    Teachers should rely on student-centred activities, such as reading games and digital read-alouds, to enable greater independent learning.

    Make Use Of Visuals - Making reading education more interesting for pupils is possible through the use of visual aids like mind maps, slideshows, and even drawings. Tools such as storybook generators and digital whiteboards are readily available for use by teachers in the creation of visuals.

    Zoom's group setting is ideal for the tried-and-true teaching strategy of "think, pair, share," which is a great technique to boost students' online reading comprehension.

    Think-Pair-Share is widely used in both pre-reading and post-reading activities since it's such a good approach to present and debate reading material.

    Teachers can present a topic or discussion question to their classes on Zoom, and then send them to small group breakout rooms to continue the discussion in pairs. The class can then reconvene during the Zoom session to share their findings and receive feedback from their peers.

    There will be a heavy focus on solo reading practice in the Zoom-delivered reading teaching.

    It entails providing kids with adequate reading materials and time to read independently.

    Teachers can use the Zoom meeting to introduce and assess student understanding of newly assigned readings through pre- and post-reading activities.

    Activities like these can be done both before and after reading to ensure that the material has been understood.

    Make use of reading-related mobile apps and digital games to teach the subject during the zoom meeting, using reading apps and online reading games is one of the most efficient methods to employ online resources for reading education.

    By utilising online reading games or reading applications together, educators and their students can have a significantly more engaged and interesting learning environment.

    Most modern computers have a feature called "share screen" that allows you to broadcast your screen to another user.

    Need a curriculum for a primary school program? Learning English, Math, Science, and the Humanities has never been easier thanks to Dr. Study's online and in-person program for kids.

    Attempting to teach pupils how to read in a digital environment is a daunting task for everyone who has tried it. It might be difficult to know where to begin because there are so many options for methods and techniques.

    In this post, we'll take a look at five distinct approaches to online reading instruction and offer some advice on how to get the most of them. We hope that you will be able to use this material to help your kids become successful readers.

    students online2

    Tips For Teaching Reading Online

    Virtual Reading Aloud With Students Requires the Use of Two Devices

    Before commencing the actual teaching part of the procedure, a complete setup and preparation with the right technology is required.

    If you want your students to see the digital resources you're utilising during a meeting, whether it's on Zoom, Google Meet, or another platform, you should have a way to share your screen with them.

    A webcam, such as a Doc Cam, can be used to demonstrate real-world objects to students.

    Then you'd utilise the other gadget to engage in conversation with your class!

    One obvious advantage is that you can better tailor your lessons to the needs of your students if you can see the world through their eyes.

    Conduct Tests on Reading Comprehension and Performance Standards

    Creating a benchmark for your students' work is the first step in identifying their specific areas of struggle.

    Since different schools employ varying standards to determine students' reading levels, it's important to make the most of any and all digital tools at your disposal.

    The digital supplementary materials offered by the authors of many of these books and manuals make them suitable for use in distance evaluations.

    If not, you may want to find out if other educators have created comparable tools for use in the classroom. The last school year has seen remarkable collaboration between teachers digitising resources for distribution to their colleagues.

    Although it may seem thus at first, not everything at your disposal is always digital.

    To illustrate, there exists an entirely analogue benchmark evaluation kit.

    There is a printed version of everything, from the instructional guide and student workbook to the differentiated reading levels.

    A camera or Google Slides can be used to quickly display students anything in the classroom.

    Also, plan ahead to meet with each kid individually during the school day. It is possible to provide one student individual attention in a virtual classroom while yet monitoring the progress of all students. Make sure you give yourself enough time to do the job!

    Sort Students Into Groups According to Their Current Skill Sets

    Now is the time to divide your class into reading groups.

    Try to schedule a weekly meeting with each group.

    With such a big knowledge gap having arisen after last year's springtime distance learning programmes and subsequent summer vacation, it is recommended that you focus more on your lower groups this year.

    Maintaining a high level of productivity is essential for the remote work you'll be asked to accomplish after the summer break.

    It may be difficult to schedule this task, even if you are utilising the hybrid format.

    The best time for group sessions is probably when most students are working independently. Maintain a "Must Do, May Do" board to keep track of pressing tasks and those that can wait.

    Students living on and away from school can benefit from this list. Students have "Must Do" homework to complete when they are not in reading groups.

    Typically, it works autonomously to hone a skill that was previously taught or to complete reading assignments that call for independent reading.

    You can give students "May Dos" if they finish their "Must Dos" early or if they are waiting their turn with their reading group.

    Before dividing the class into smaller groups, go over the list with them, demonstrate what they need to do for each item, and have them repeat after you.

    Each child's individual requirements are met in Dr. Study's Intensive  Early Childhood Program.

    Through our support, young students can build self-esteem and a lifelong love of learning as they get ready for their first experiences in a formal school setting.

    Try Round-Robin Reading

    One way to keep a group of youngsters interested in reading lessons over the course of a week is to have them take turns reading aloud to the class.

    This holds true whether students are reading together as a class, in pairs, or independently. It is not just in the English and Language Arts departments where reading practise can be introduced.

    Encourage your students to do as much reading aloud as they can.

    For instance, if you have a worksheet or task, you should read the directions and complete them exactly as written.

    In social studies and science classes, students might take turns reading aloud word problems and graphic captions.

    The ways in which this can appear are rather numerous. Reading time is provided for all students in a classroom regardless of the curriculum being studied.

    Inviting students to read aloud in front of the class, either in person or online, is something you should do often.

    To make sure you've considered everyone's thoughts and requests, keep a checklist on hand and refer to it frequently during the day.

    Students' capacity to correctly and independently apply a concept or skill in the context of a given event is the most reliable indicator of whether or not they have truly mastered the topic or skill at hand.

    Make Frequent Comprehension Checks

    The capacity to understand what you read is the most important factor in learning new material and remembering it later.

    Having the ability to read does not guarantee comprehension.

    Current students can vouch to its validity.

    Taking regular stops to check for comprehension is essential when helping children develop their online reading skills.

    It can be helpful to ask questions like "What does that word mean?" to narrow down the search for an explanation.

    In other words, what is the author's intended message here? Provide a brief synopsis of the story's progression so far.

    Where did they find the motivation to write these words?

    Give your students plenty of time to read, both on their own and in small groups.

    To ensure that students have constant access to literature, you may, for instance, offer them access to digital materials in the form of virtual libraries.

    Providing Students with Necessary Resources

    Our goal is for students to learn the reading skills they'll need to succeed in their courses and in life, as well as to develop a love of reading that will serve them well in future reading assignments and beyond.

    Thus, it is important to teach these skills openly so that students understand that they may be applied to a wide range of texts.

    To better prepare students for the reading component of asynchronous learning, which is common in the setting of distant education, we can teach them during synchronous learning.

    Using our learning management systems, we may design "gateway activities'' for students to do before being granted access to the reading content.

    How Do I Start Interacting With People Online?

    It's easier to do this face-to-face, but many of the methods outlined above can be adapted for use with online classes. In other words, you can keep sending out those parent surveys and daily trivia questions.

    Having meaningful talks and making in-depth observations will be more challenging in a virtual environment, but you may still take note of things like their favourite books, artwork, and even toys, décor, pets, and siblings.

    In addition, you may choose to suggest that the students bring a shareable item (show).

    Avoiding "brag and bring" behaviour, in which guests bring their most prized possessions to show off, can be accomplished with a central topic.

    You can learn more about the kid and how he or she thinks by considering all of these factors.

    In addition to familiarising themselves with their pupils, instructors can use the first few weeks of school to build a feeling of community in their classrooms. Morning meetings, shared reading, singing, chants, and games are just a few examples of the kinds of activities that foster a stronger sense of community.

    You can keep up with many of these tasks online through a few weekly video conference meetings with the rest of the class.

    Building a sense of classroom community is a top priority of mine, alongside getting to know each student individually.

    Our morning meeting is the most common time for this, but we often use other shared activities.

    Many different kinds of literature, music, chants, and games make up these shard pursuits. A sizable fraction of them can still be executed digitally, with some modifications perhaps required.

    pexels artem podrez 4492135

    Let’s Go Back to the Idea of “Gradual Release” of Accountability.

    In a world where numerous technology solutions exist, it is easy to lose focus on what is truly important.

    One "thing" that counts is the careless neglect of responsibilities.

    All three of these practices—reading aloud, having students read aloud, and providing children with time to read independently—are crucial for creating readers who will continue to read throughout their lives.

    This is possible even when communicating with students in another location.

    Reading To Students:

    • Reading aloud to the other person on a video conference is easy to do. Keep the book at normal reading height, or, if a document camera will be more helpful, place it under the book.
    • You might want to keep a record of the books you read aloud. If you don't have much time in class to read to your pupils, they can always watch read-alouds on their own time. You can stop the recording at any point to ask questions, even if you're in the middle of it.
    • An easy extension activity that may be completed as individual work is to have students draw or write in response to a story or text about what they take away from it. Here are some reading response packs that you may use as a resource for questions and activities to do after you've finished a book: Those in the earliest grades, the primary and secondary school students, are the focus here.

    Reading With Students:

    • Read-aloud time should be incorporated. Reading aloud as a group completely changes the dynamic of the activity. During shared reading, you and the students take turns reading aloud to one another. To help children improve their reading skills, demonstrate how to decode words, pay close attention to punctuation, and make use of text elements, and then practise these techniques with them. Use a document camera to view the text as you read it, whether you're focusing on a specific passage or the entire thing. Collaborative reading has the potential to significantly improve online reading instruction with the correct technology.

    Having Students Read By Themselves:

    • Make sure that parents understand the importance of independent reading. Create interactive learning platforms like Epic and RAZ Kids. The whole family can have a talk with the kids about how to keep reading for long periods of time (starting with small chunks of independent reading time and gradually working their way up).
    • Have you been feeling concerned that your children aren't reading enough? Throw a virtual "silent reading party" Students open Zoom with their books held out and microphones silenced. You'll feel like you're in a classroom full of students because everyone reads at the same time. When kids discuss what they've read, they gain a deeper understanding of what they've read. A pajama-clad book club meeting seems like a lot of fun.
    • Conduct reading conferences with students via one-on-one video conversations whenever possible. Expect significant time demands (don't try to include every child every week!). though it pays off

    We should bear in mind the concept of gradual transfer of responsibility whether we are standing in front of a classroom or interacting solely through digital means. This method has been shown to work!

    Understand That There Are Constraints to Online Instruction and Design Your Course Accordingly.

    There are specific difficulties associated with instructing students online. And if you're used to teaching in person, the constraints of an online environment may be difficult to adjust to.

    The following are some suggestions that may be useful:

    • Calm down and take a deep breath when you run across difficulties. We all experience frustration from time to time, but it serves no purpose to let your anger boil over over something you have no power to change (like a connection that won't stay established).
    • Keep in mind that children have short attention spans, which can be even shorter during an online session. Allow plenty of time for pupils to interact verbally and physically.
    • Let's say you're in a situation where you don't have as much time as you would in a "regular" school day, but you still have to cover the same amount of content. Period. Make sure each lesson is of high quality rather than just a large number, and modify your speed accordingly.

    Just because your lessons appear different than they would during the "regular" school year doesn't mean your pupils aren't still learning!

    Anticipate That Children (And Even Their Parents) Will Forget Things, and Provide Them With Tools to Do So.

    When children (and often even their own parents) forget what has been taught or described three times, it can be discouraging.

    Anchor charts are fantastic visual aides, and they look great on the walls of any "regular" classroom.

    If they are stuck, they can always ask their classmates for advice. Every household is given a physical copy of the correspondence for their files.

    However, in the digital realm, not all children and their families have the same opportunities.

    That some things will just never register in people's minds is undoubtedly a safe assumption to make. That's a problem that plagues everyone at some point!

    Give your students and their families the tools they need to succeed in reading by providing them with the following materials:

    • A video of you showcasing your skills, such as reading a coded phrase, reciting a poem, etc. (Kids can watch these multiple times if they want to!)
    • Educational and household use of interactive digital anchor charts (Visuals like the ones in reading workshop toolkits can be copied from a screenshot and pasted into a presentation platform like Google Slides or Seesaw).
    • A consolidated location where parents may find all of your additional resources (recorded films, anchor charts, etc.).

    Millions of students around the world are falling behind in their studies. Dr. Study offers a variety of tutoring programs to help your child succeed in school.

    Conclusion

    The best way for teachers to prepare their students for online learning is to learn to adapt to new kinds of education. To do this, they should keep things as simple and basic as possible and concentrate on a single reading during the course of the lessons.

    They should also use student-centred activities such as reading games and digital read-alouds, and use visual aids such as mind maps, slideshows, and drawings to make reading education more interesting.

    Finally, they should use Zoom's group setting to boost students' online reading comprehension.

    Making use of reading-related mobile apps and digital games to teach the subject during a zoom meeting is one of the most efficient methods to employ online resources for reading education.

    This post looks at five distinct approaches to online reading instruction and offers advice on how to get the most of them.

    Virtual Reading Aloud with students requires the use of two devices, and conducting tests on Reading Comprehension and Performance Standards is the first step in identifying their specific areas of struggle.

    Digital supplementary materials offered by the authors of many of these books and manuals make them suitable for use in distance evaluations. 

    The last school year has seen remarkable collaboration between teachers digitising resources for distribution to their colleagues.

    This includes an analogue benchmark evaluation kit, a printed version of everything, a camera or Google Slides, and meeting with each student individually during the school day.

    To divide students into groups according to their current skill sets, try to schedule a weekly meeting with each group and maintain a high level of productivity. Additionally, maintain a "Must Do, May Do" board to keep track of pressing tasks and those that can wait.

    Round-Robin Reading is a great way to keep young students interested in reading lessons over the course of a week. Encourage students to do as much reading aloud as they can, and make frequent comprehension checks.

    Give students plenty of time to read, both on their own and in small groups, and provide them with necessary resources such as digital materials in the form of virtual libraries.

    This will help them build self-esteem and a lifelong love of learning.

    The most important details are that it is important to teach students the reading skills they need to succeed in their courses and in life, as well as to develop a love of reading that will serve them well in future reading assignments and beyond.

    To better prepare students for asynchronous learning, we can design "gateway activities" for students to do before being granted access to the reading content.

    To build a sense of classroom community, instructors can use the first few weeks of school to build a feeling of community through morning meetings, shared reading, singing, chants, and games.

    Finally, the idea of "gradual release" of accountability should be used to ensure that students are held accountable for their performance.

    Reading aloud, having students read aloud, and providing children with time to read independently are important practices for creating readers who will continue to read throughout their lives.

    These practices include reading aloud to the other person on a video conference, reading with students as a group, and having students read by themselves.

    Additionally, parents should have a talk with their children about how to keep reading for long periods of time.

    Collaborative reading has the potential to significantly improve online reading instruction with the correct technology.

    Throw a virtual "silent reading party" and conduct reading conferences with students via one-on-one video conversations.

    Understand the constraints of online instruction and design your course accordingly.

    Calm down and take a deep breath when encountering difficulties.

    Allow plenty of time for pupils to interact verbally and physically.

    Make sure each lesson is of high quality and modify its speed accordingly, anticipate that children (and even their parents) will forget things, and provide them with tools to do so.

    Anchor charts are great visual aides, but not all children and their families have the same opportunities.

    Provide students and their families with the tools they need to succeed in reading by providing them with a video of their skills, educational and household use of interactive digital anchor charts, and a consolidated location where parents can find additional resources. 

    Content Summary

    • The best way for teachers to prepare their students for online learning is to learn to adapt to new kinds of education, rather than trying to modify their current methods to fit the online learning environment.
    • Listed below are some tips and tricks for implementing an online reading curriculum: 
    • When teaching reading online, keep things as simple and basic as possible for the sake of the students.
    • Keep to a single task at a time and concentrate on a single reading during the course of the lessons.
    • Make sure your classroom is always a fun and interesting place to learn.
    • One of the most critical features of online reading instruction is the capacity to keep students engaged and involved in the lessons.
    • Teachers should rely on student-centred activities, such as reading games and digital read-alouds, to enable greater independent learning.
    • Make Use Of Visuals - Making reading education more interesting for pupils is possible through the use of visual aids like mind maps, slideshows, and even drawings.
    • Zoom's group setting is ideal for the tried-and-true teaching strategy of "think, pair, share," which is a great technique to boost students' online reading comprehension.
    • There will be a heavy focus on solo reading practice in the Zoom-delivered reading teaching.
    • Activities like these can be done both before and after reading to ensure that the material has been understood.
    • Make use of reading-related mobile apps and digital games to teach the subject during the zoom meeting, using reading apps and online reading games is one of the most efficient methods to employ online resources for reading education.
    • By utilising online reading games or reading applications together, educators and their students can have a significantly more engaged and interesting learning environment.
    • Attempting to teach pupils how to read in a digital environment is a daunting task for everyone who has tried it.
    • In this post, we'll take a look at five distinct approaches to online reading instruction and offer some advice on how to get the most of them.
    • We hope that you will be able to use this material to help your kids become successful readers.
    • If you want your students to see the digital resources you're utilising during a meeting, whether it's on Zoom, Google Meet, or another platform, you should have a way to share your screen with them.
    • The digital supplementary materials offered by the authors of many of these books and manuals make them suitable for use in distance evaluations.
    • If not, you may want to find out if other educators have created comparable tools for use in the classroom.
    • A camera or Google Slides can be used to quickly display students anything in the classroom.
    • Make sure you give yourself enough time to do the job!
    • Now is the time to divide your class into reading groups.
    • Try to schedule a weekly meeting with each group.
    • Maintaining a high level of productivity is essential for the remote work you'll be asked to accomplish after the summer break.
    • Students have "Must Do" homework to complete when they are not in reading groups.
    • One way to keep a group of youngsters interested in reading lessons over the course of a week is to have them take turns reading aloud to the class.
    • Encourage your students to do as much reading aloud as they can.
    • Reading time is provided for all students in a classroom regardless of the curriculum being studied.
    • Inviting students to read aloud in front of the class, either in person or online, is something you should do often.
    • Having the ability to read does not guarantee comprehension.
    • Give your students plenty of time to read, both on their own and in small groups.
    • Our goal is for students to learn the reading skills they'll need to succeed in their courses and in life, as well as to develop a love of reading that will serve them well in future reading assignments and beyond.
    • To better prepare students for the reading component of asynchronous learning, which is common in the setting of distant education, we can teach them during synchronous learning.
    • Using our learning management systems, we may design "gateway activities'' for students to do before being granted access to the reading content.
    • In addition to familiarising themselves with their pupils, instructors can use the first few weeks of school to build a feeling of community in their classrooms.
    • Morning meetings, shared reading, singing, chants, and games are just a few examples of the kinds of activities that foster a stronger sense of community.
    • You can keep up with many of these tasks online through a few weekly video conference meetings with the rest of the class.
    • Building a sense of classroom community is a top priority of mine, alongside getting to know each student individually.
    • A sizable fraction of them can still be executed digitally, with some modifications perhaps required.
    • All three of these practices—reading aloud, having students read aloud, and providing children with time to read independently—are crucial for creating readers who will continue to read throughout their lives.
    • Reading aloud to the other person on a video conference is easy to do.
    • You might want to keep a record of the books you read aloud.
    • If you don't have much time in class to read to your pupils, they can always watch read-alouds on their own time.
    • Read-aloud time should be incorporated.
    • Reading aloud as a group completely changes the dynamic of the activity.
    • During shared reading, you and the students take turns reading aloud to one another.
    • Make sure that parents understand the importance of independent reading.
    • Create interactive learning platforms like Epic and RAZ Kids.
    • Throw a virtual "silent reading party" Students open Zoom with their books held out and microphones silenced.
    • You'll feel like you're in a classroom full of students because everyone reads at the same time.
    • A pajama-clad book club meeting seems like a lot of fun.
    • Conduct reading conferences with students via one-on-one video conversations whenever possible.
    • Expect significant time demands (don't try to include every child every week!).
    • Though it pays off, we should bear in mind the concept of gradual transfer of responsibility whether we are standing in front of a classroom or interacting solely through digital means.
    • There are specific difficulties associated with instructing students online.
    • And if you're used to teaching in person, the constraints of an online environment may be difficult to adjust to.
    • The following are some suggestions that may be useful: 
    • Calm down and take a deep breath when you run across difficulties.
    • Keep in mind that children have short attention spans, which can be even shorter during an online session.
    • Allow plenty of time for pupils to interact verbally and physically.
    • Make sure each lesson is of high quality rather than just a large number, and modify your speed accordingly.
    • Anchor charts are fantastic visual aides, and they look great on the walls of any "regular" classroom.
    • However, in the digital realm, not all children and their families have the same opportunities.
    • Give your students and their families the tools they need to succeed in reading by providing them with the following materials: A video of you showcasing your skills, such as reading a coded phrase, reciting a poem, etc. 
    • Educational and household use of interactive digital anchor charts (Visuals like the ones in reading workshop toolkits can be copied from a screenshot and pasted into a presentation platform like Google Slides or Seesaw).

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Skimming. Skimming will help you grasp the general idea or gist of a text. 
    • Scanning. Scanning allows you to locate precise information. 
    • Detailed reading. Detailed reading allows you to consider aspects of the text critically. 
    • Revision reading.

    While-Reading Activities help students focus on aspects of the text and understand it better. The goal of these activities is to help learners to deal as they would deal with it as if you wrote the text in their first language.

    Online reading is the process of extracting meaning from a text that is in a digital format. Also called digital reading. Most researchers agree that the experience of reading online (whether on a PC or a mobile device) is fundamentally different from the experience of reading print materials.

    To improve students' reading comprehension, teachers should introduce the seven cognitive strategies of effective readers: activating, inferring, monitoring-clarifying, questioning, searching-selecting, summarising, and visualising-organising.

    Good readers actively engage with the story and identify with the characters. They visualise what is happening, follow the story's events, and anticipate what will happen next. A good reader can explore the meaning of a story and connect it to their own life.

    Author

    • Dr. Olga Abeysekera

      Olga has a PhD in Management from Monash University. Her research focused on how personal differences and social networking impact creativity in the tech industry. She has extensive teaching experience at universities and private tutoring centers, praised for her engaging methods and clear insights. Olga also writes for top academic journals and creates innovative programs that enhance skills and consulting methods. She believes in the power of education to inspire ongoing growth in both studies and careers.

    js_loader
    Scroll to Top
    ×
    Get a Personalised Tutoring Quote    
    Get a Personalised Tutoring Quote