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How To Help Your Child Improve Their Handwriting?

(Last Updated On: February 20, 2023)
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    Do you wish there was a way to improve your child's handwriting? Do they frequently ask for your help with the various school-required writing assignments?

    If so, you should know that you're not alone.

    The good news is that you can help the many children who struggle with their handwriting by employing a few simple strategies.

    If you want to help your child improve their handwriting, you'll find some advice in today's article.

    Struggling to decipher your kid's illegible handwriting?

    In other words, you are not alone in thinking this way as a parent; many others have similar feelings.

    Several parents, OTs, and teachers have brought to my attention the fact that today's kids and teenagers do not have the same handwriting proficiency as their predecessors did at the same age.

    You might be wondering if, in this day and age of increased use of electronic media, good penmanship is still important for your child.

    You may have realised that your child will grow up in a society that places a higher value on the ability to type.

    The increased utilisation of electronic devices has led to a decrease in the percentage of time spent writing, but handwriting is still necessary for the workplace.

    Your child will benefit from using a signature when signing off on handwritten lists or notes.

    Is your child struggling with school and feeling like they’re falling behind? Dr Study offers a range of Melbourne tutors to help your child achieve success in school – and beyond.

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    Improving your fine motor abilities might be as simple as learning to write legibly.

    Your child may be able to reduce the likelihood of misunderstandings by learning to write more clearly.

    For instance, the instructor may be unable to read the assignment your child has turned in.

    Your child will spend less and less time on handwriting practise as they go up through school. While some schools have reintroduced cursive into the curriculum, others just teach it for signatures.

    It's possible that by the time your child reaches the third grade, the amount of handwriting practise they receive in school won't be enough to improve their skills.

    If your child is in fourth grade or above, they don't need to do homework.

    More and more elementary and middle schools are cutting back on handwriting instruction, and many high schools no longer provide any instruction at all.

    Because of this, a lot of students in middle school will develop negative patterns of behaviour.

    The good news is that you can help your kid or teen become a better writer by teaching them a few tips and tricks.

    This is where you'll find advice and methods like those mentioned.

    These suggestions may even prove useful in the evaluation of your handwriting!

    Methods for Improving Your Child's Handwriting

    Make Practising Fun

    Children are likely to get bored if they are constantly asked to write the same letters or words.

    Give them a reason to write that is both interesting and useful.

    Avoid having them merely copy down words by using exciting new elements to pique their interest and ease the burden of the task at hand.

    Offer your child a special pencil or a set with a selection of different hues.

    Instead of giving her a list of words to repeat, try teaching her something instead.

    You could give her simple word puzzles, anagrams, or a game of hangman, or have her make a list of ideas related to a specific topic to give her writing practise a goal.

    Encourage Drawing And Puzzle Games

    The physical abilities required for writing—including the right way to hold a pencil, proper posture, control, agility, and coordination—are best fostered by providing your child with ample opportunities to manipulate objects.

    Simple activities like learning to use cutlery can help him develop his dexterity.

    Pinpoint The Problem

    The most common types of handwriting mistakes involve the formation of the letters, their size, the spacing between the words, and the alignment of the lines.

    When your child practises, check to see that she is using both hands to hold the paper steady and focusing on the toughest letters or concepts.

    The Right Tools

    If your child is having trouble using a standard pencil, try switching him or her over to a kid-sized pencil that is shorter or smaller.

    Make sure he has access to a quality eraser so he can experiment freely and gain valuable experience.

    Use the Correct Pencil

    One of the most essential things a person can do to enhance their handwriting is to utilise appropriate stationery.

    Pens and pencils that are too thick or too thin can make it difficult to write.

    Making sure the pencil is the right size for your kid's hands will help them write more smoothly and with more comfort.

    The thicker the pencil or crayon, the easier it may be for young children in preschool or kindergarten with a weak grasp.

    For one thing, thicker pens and pencils need less pressure from the user.

    Young children often use their entire fists to grasp a pencil when they are just learning. A good pencil isn't enough for legible handwriting; you should also use good-quality paper.

    Writing Outside The Box

    A surface could be a muddy patch, a fogged-up mirror, or a bowl of stale spaghetti sauce.

    Whether your child is learning to write with his fingers, a stick, or a pencil, encouraging his imagination will increase his motivation to write.

    Check Their Grip

    Observe the way that they hold the pen.

    Some students manage to get through the educational system without ever truly mastering the art of written expression.

    While your child may not need to practise their grip if they are in third grade or above, they may still benefit from doing so if they are in kindergarten, first grade, or second grade.

    Get your kid to pinch the writing end of a pen or pencil between their index finger and thumb, then flip it over so it rests on the edge of their hand. This is a straightforward method for instructing them in the art of object manipulation.

    Millions of students around the world struggle with academics. Dr. Study provides a variety of online learning and tutoring programs to assist your child to get ahead.

    Ensure An Appropriate Environment

    Most preteens and teenagers can be helped to write better once they are made aware of these four mistakes.

    Other kids, however, need more drills to develop the skills and routine of paying attention while writing.

    It's important for your child to practise their OT-learned skills at home.

    Your child needs a supportive setting in which to develop his or her writing skills.

    A child's body will be in the best possible writing position if they are seated in a chair that is both comfortable and allows them to rest their feet on the floor or provides a footrest while working at a table or desk that is roughly elbow height.

    Distractions have a negative effect on learning, make it harder to absorb information, and cause people to lose interest and leave the classroom.

    Providing your child with a well-lit space will help them see their assignments clearly.

    Comfort, noise, and lighting can all have an impact on a person's ability to write.

    Teaching Cursive Handwriting

    For kids who have trouble with print, a cursive is a great option. Also, make sure your kid learns to write his or her name in cursive.

    Additional Tips

    You should get your child tested for dysgraphia if they are having extraordinary difficulties with handwriting.

    The root cause of dysgraphia is not always easy to identify.

    If your kid has completed the grade levels at which handwriting training is given, you can use homework reviews to gently point out any problems in their handwriting.

    This is especially useful if your child is older than the age at which most schools begin teaching cursive writing.

    Make sure they have a quiet, well-lit, and comfortable place to do their homework. When seated in a chair, your child's feet should be able to touch the floor.

    When writing, they must have adequate space to open up their page and use their dominant hand without restriction.

    These methods can be used in conjunction with recommendations from your child's occupational therapist or school if he or she is still in the process of learning how to write in the current grade.

    Keeping the Proper Pace When Writing

    A good rhythm is essential. Writer's cramps, letter distortion, and other errors are common among young writers who write too quickly for their ages.

    If you take too long to write a sentence, they may get bored and give up.

    Having the option to correct illegible writing encourages kids to write legibly from the outset. Your child can improve his or her writing speed with consistent practise. Putting in regular practise is crucial.

    Make Sure All Loops Are Closed

    It causes illegible handwriting in which it is difficult to tell the letters apart, especially the lowercase letters a through c and the capital letter o. It doesn't matter if the text is cursive or manuscript; you can't read it if there are gaps where letters should be.

    Instruct your child by pointing out the blank spaces in their writing. I'm hoping that if we can get the word out, they'll be inspired to start dismantling the circles already. If you notice a closed loop, give it some helpful criticism.

    Check To See How Letters Line Up

    Gather an example of your kid's handwriting and check to see if the letter heights line up with the lines or the heights of other letters. It is a telltale sign of sloppy handwriting that the letters are all different sizes.

    It's possible that your letters will not all fit within the confines of the lines on the lined paper.

    Encourage your kid to take note of the differences in letter size as they move through these stages.

    In order to boost their self-esteem and stop them from feeling defensive, it's important to call attention to letters that are well proportioned. Furthermore, it's important to highlight properly proportioned letters.

    If your child is still learning how to write in the current grade, you can use the aforementioned strategies in conjunction with the advice given by their occupational therapist or school.

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    You want the best for your children, and that includes giving them a strong foundation in early childhood learning. With Dr Study, you can be sure that your child is getting the best possible early childhood education that is tailored to each of their needs.

    Even if you stress the importance of clear, legible handwriting to your child, he or she may not share your perspective.

    Maybe your kid or teen thinks they have plenty of time to worry about things like handwriting when they get older.

    Many older kids and teens wrongly believe that they are permanently stuck with their poor handwriting.

    Some people believe that after finishing primary school, the next logical step is to work on developing a signature and a handwriting style.

    Those who put in the time and effort to practise will eventually be rewarded with neat handwriting.

    Rather than nitpicking or arguing with your child, you might try explaining that everyone's handwriting is different and encouraging them to embrace that fact.

    Put it in their mind that they need at least one person to read what they have written.

    The following are some suggestions that can help you improve your handwriting if you feel that it needs improvement.

    Showing your child how to set a good example in this area will teach them that it is possible for them to improve their handwriting and will also teach them the steps necessary to do so.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    • Make Practising Fun. Offer your child a special pencil or a rainbow of coloured ones.
    • Encourage Drawing and Puzzle Games. 
    • Pinpoint the Problem. 
    • The Right Tools. 
    • Writing Outside the Box.

    A child at this age will be able to print many words. They should manage a task that requires some skill, such as doing up a necklace. Children should be able to form the upper and lower letter correctly. Their visual memory will have developed.

    Handwriting involves many aspects of movement — from forming letters to positioning the body and applying the right amount of pressure. That's why messy handwriting is often caused by poor motor (movement) skills, like fine motor skills.

    Teachers report that the handwriting of both boys and girls with ADHD is immature, messy, and illegible.

    Students with ADHD often have difficulties with writing, especially in terms of spelling. The most common issues are reversing or omitting letters, words, or phrases. Students may spell the same word differently within the same essay.

    Conclusion

    The use of a signature when approving handwritten lists or notes is just one example of the easy strategies suggested in this article for helping your child develop better penmanship. Good penmanship is still important for children in a society that places a higher value on typing, and this is especially true in this age of increased use of electronic media.

    A child's fine motor skills can be boosted simply by teaching them to write legibly. However, the more they progress through school, the less likely it is that they will receive adequate opportunities to practise handwriting. The best way to improve a student's writing is to make practise enjoyable, to encourage creative approaches like drawing and puzzle games, and to zero in on the specific areas that need improvement. The best way to help your child develop physical skills like pencil grasp, posture, self-control, agility, and coordination is to give them plenty of opportunities to practise with real-world objects.

    Content Summary

    • The good news is that you can help the many children who struggle with their handwriting by employing a few simple strategies.
    • You might be wondering if, in this day and age of increased use of electronic media, good penmanship is still important for your child.
    • You may have realised that your child will grow up in a society that places a higher value on the ability to type.
    • The increased utilisation of electronic devices has led to a decrease in the percentage of time spent writing, but handwriting is still necessary for the workplace.
    • Your child will benefit from using a signature when signing off on handwritten lists or notes.
    • Improving your fine motor abilities might be as simple as learning to write legibly.
    • Your child may be able to reduce the likelihood of misunderstandings by learning to write more clearly.
    • Your child will spend less and less time on handwriting practise as they go up through school.
    • It's possible that by the time your child reaches the third grade, the amount of handwriting practise they receive in school won't be enough to improve their skills.
    • If your child is in fourth grade or above, they don't need to do homework.
    • More and more elementary and middle schools are cutting back on handwriting instruction, and many high schools no longer provide any instruction at all.
    • Because of this, a lot of students in middle school will develop negative patterns of behaviour.
    • The good news is that you can help your kid or teen become a better writer by teaching them a few tips and tricks.
    • These suggestions may even prove useful in the evaluation of your handwriting!
    • Children are likely to get bored if they are constantly asked to write the same letters or words.
    • Give them a reason to write that is both interesting and useful.
    • Offer your child a special pencil or a set with a selection of different hues.
    • You could give her simple word puzzles, anagrams, or a game of hangman, or have her make a list of ideas related to a specific topic to give her writing practise a goal.
    • The physical abilities required for writing—including the right way to hold a pencil, proper posture, control, agility, and coordination—are best fostered by providing your child with ample opportunities to manipulate objects.

     

    Author

    • Dr. Olga Abeysekera

      Olga has a PhD in Management from Monash University. Her research focused on how personal differences and social networking impact creativity in the tech industry. She has extensive teaching experience at universities and private tutoring centers, praised for her engaging methods and clear insights. Olga also writes for top academic journals and creates innovative programs that enhance skills and consulting methods. She believes in the power of education to inspire ongoing growth in both studies and careers.

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